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Migration Rules and Regulations


The UK government does as much as is possible to publish information about immigration. It tries to be transparent as a part of their commitment to freedom of information. However there are some pieces that are deemed sensitive and withheld. Mostly all information is freely available in original form on the web.

Immigration rules to the United Kingdom were amended and last updated in September 2010. There are many legal documents that are available online that will give potential applicants an idea of what binds them legally. The rules and laws are all laid down in the following categories:

  • Introduction to laws
  • General provisions regarding leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom
  • Persons seeking to enter or remain in the United Kingdom for visits
  • Persons seeking to enter or remain in the United Kingdom for studies
  • Persons seeking to enter or remain in the United Kingdom in an "au pair" placement, as a working holidaymaker or for training or work experience
  • Persons seeking to enter or remain in the United Kingdom for employment
  • Persons seeking to enter or remain in the United Kingdom as a businessman, self-employed person, investor, writer, composer or artist
  • Points-Based System
  • Migrants
  • (Youth Mobility Scheme) Temporary Migrants
  • (Temporary Worker) Migrants
  • (General) Student
  • (Child) Student
  • Other Categories
  • Family Members
  • General grounds for the refusal of entry clearance, leave to enter, leave to remain, variation of leave to enter or remain and curtailment of leave in the United Kingdom
  • Registration with the Police
  • Asylum Part A
  • Temporary Protection
  • Asylum Part B
  • Procedure and Rights of Appeal

Two key acts have shaped the migration law greatly in the United Kingdom:

  • UK Borders Act 2007
  • The Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009

The UK Borders Act 2007

The UK Borders Act of 2007 brought in by the Parliament of the United Kingdom focus on immigration and asylum. Apart from other things, it also brought into focus the compulsory biometric residence permits for all non-EU nationals. It also introduced greater powers for the immigration control. In specific, it equips immigration officers with many police like powers that include search, seizure, entry and detention. This act came into force on October 30, 2007.

The Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009

The Borders, British Citizenship and Immigration Act of 2009 was an act enabled by the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It received the Royal Assent on July 21, 2009. This act particularly focused on residents who’ve been living in the United Kingdom for over five years. Prior to this act, individuals who had been living in the UK for over five years were eligible to apply for the Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR). However, with the enactment of this act, any individuals who have resided in the United Kingdom for over five years are not automatically considered for ‘probationary citizenship’. They are then expected to earn points through volunteer work or civic activism. Once they have enough points, they can then be eligible for full citizenship.

Migration


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